How to Keep From Treating People With Disabilities Differently

Workshop Goals

To understand the history of American attitudes and legislation regarding people with disabilities;

To learn how to properly assist individuals with disabilities in a courteous and respectful manner;

To practice providing assistance to people with disabilities, both fellow employees and museum guests.

In order to gain the most out of the presentation, please:

  • Listen with an open mind;
  • Be respectful of each other;
  • Challenge your thinking;
  • Be willing to learn something new that you can use on the job!

Challenge Activity

Bean Bags

  • Place a bean bag on your head
  • Move to the music!
  • If your bean bag falls off your head, freeze until another player, without losing his/her beanbag, retrieves the fallen one and replaces it on the frozen person’s head.
  • If the rescuer loses his/her beanbag, then he/she is also frozen until another person appears to rescue them both.

What is the object of the game?

How do you “win”?

What is the advantage of picking up a classmate’s beanbag?

What is the Definition of a Disability?

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), as amended by the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA), prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in several key areas including: state and local government services, places of public accommodation, employment, telecommunications and transportation.

The individual with a disability is a person who (3 part definition):

  • Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities;
  • Has a record of such an impairment, even if they do not currently have the impairment; or
  • Being regarded as having such an impairment.

What is considered a disability?

The ADA does not list conditions that are considered disabilities; however it does list those which are not included.

Not covered by the ADA are homosexuality, bisexuality, transvestism, transsexualism, compulsive gambling, kleptomania, pyromania, pedophilia, exhibitionism, voyeurism, gender identity disorders not resulting from physical impairments, other sexual behavior disorders.

The ADA does not cover individuals who are currently engaging in illegal drug use.

A short-term condition is generally is not a disability. The test is whether the impairment markedly limits major life activities when assessing the duration, scope, and impact of the impairment.

Small Group Activity

Divide into small to discuss your experiences and examples of instances you have assisted co-workers or museum guests with the following disabilities:

  • Physical
  • Sensory
  • Intellectual or Developmental
  • Emotional
  • Invisible

Remember that each person’s situation is unique!

Physical disabilities: a limitation on a person’s physical functioning, mobility, dexterity or stamina; a short list of examples:

  • Spinal cord injury
  • Amputation
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Spina bifida
  • Musculoskeletal injuries (eg back injury)
  • Arthritis
  • Muscular dystrophy

Sensory impairment: a limitation of one or more of a person’s senses; including:

  • Hearing Loss
  • Tinnitus
  • Limited vision/Blindness
  • Loss of Smell
  • Spatial awareness

A person could be born with the impairment or could it could develop throughout the lifetime.

Intellectual disabilities – significant limitations in both intellectual functioning and in adaptive behavior, which covers social and practical skills. Originates before age 18 years. Affects approximately 3% of the population.

  • Autism Spectrum Disorders
  • Down’s Syndrome
  • Fragile X Syndrome
  • Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)

Emotional

  • Mental illness has nothing to do with intelligence.
  • Mental illness is a condition that disrupts a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, and ability to relate to others.
  • Results in a diminished capacity for dealing with everyday life
  • Can include major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, and personality disorder.

The Invisibility of Disabilities

Be sensitive that disabilities come in a variety of types, and each person is an individual

The impact of a person’s disability may not be easily seen.

Person may be perceived as lazy, when in fact, the disability impacts his/her ability to learn, work, and function.

Teachers and peers may see only behavior problems or uncooperative behaviors, rather than accommodating the disability.

A Brief History of Legislation

1964 – Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act

1973 – Rehabilitation Act, Section 504

1990 – Americans with Disabilities Act – First comprehensive civil rights law for people with disabilities.

History, continued

2008 – ADA Amendments Act

Expanded definition of the term disability to include individuals with amputations, intellectual disabilities, Epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, Muscular Dystrophy, and cancer;

Strikes a balance between employee and employer interests;

Overturned two key Supreme Court decisions (Sutton vs. United Airlines, Inc. and Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Inc. vs. Williams), where lower courts had found individual’s situation did not constitute a disability, therefore the question of discrimination had never been addressed.

American Attitudes – FDR

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

32nd President of the United States from 1933 to 1945.

Had suffered paralysis as a result of Polio.

Although the his use of a wheelchair was common knowledge, the wheelchair was not shown by the media.

Gather Your Thoughts

How do you feel about the cloaked FDR statue?

What do you think is more important: to respect President Roosevelt’s wishes OR to reflect modern views of people with disabilities?

How could this spectrum of opinion be reflected in the workplace?

As a manager, how do you work to bring understanding and acceptance among your staff, while following current ADAAA guidelines?

Let’s examine recent examples of people with disabilities who have achieved celebrity status!

Stevie Wonder

Born prematurely in 1950 in Michigan. Suffered retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), due to too much oxygen in the hospital’s incubator.

Began playing instruments at an early age and signed with Motown Records at age 11. Has had an amazing writing and recording career.

Celebrity spotlights can aid in bringing important issues into the spotlight.

Jim Abbott

Born in 1967, in Flint, Michigan, without a right hand

Baseball star for University of Michigan

Played in the 1988 Summer Olympics

Played Major League Baseball, and pitched a no-hitter in 1993 as a NY Yankee.

Amy Purdee

Born in 1979 in Las Vegas, Nevada

Contracted meningitis at age 19, resulting in double amputation below the knees and kidney transplant

Paralympic Athlete in Snowboarding – Bronze Medalist

Terminology Over Time

Crippled – an invalid and derogatory term that is no longer acceptable to describe people with disabilities;

Retarded – a medical term that can be used as a slur; no longer acceptable in everyday language:

Handicapped – something that hampers or hinders, such as in a race; no longer used in referring to people;

Normal people – avoid using this term when making a comparison, as this implies a person with a disability is not normal. Everyone is unique and has their own identity and abilities;

Person with a Disability – “people-first” language that focuses on the individual, not their condition.

Using People-First Language

American Psychological Association Style guide

  • Person’s name or pronoun first
  • Description of impairment or disability second
  • Descriptors should not modify or limit the person

Examples:

  • A boy with Down’s Syndrome, not “the Down’s Syndrome boy”;
  • Sydney has a hearing impairment, not “the deaf girl.”

Discussion: What Do You Do?

On the Job Situations You May Encounter

A guest arrives at an event with a cat in a stroller. She claims the cat is a service animal. Do you allow her entrance?

A group of 60 children is moving from the 1st floor exhibit to the 2nd floor through the only staircase in the wing. One child is on crutches. As the group’s tour guide, how do you handle the transition between floors?

What Do You Do?

Guidelines to Follow

  • If the guest claims the cat is with her as a service animal, the cat can be permitted to accompany her into the event. She does not need to produce any paperwork to justify the service animal.
  • Review the options with the student’s teacher/chaperone. If the child wishes to take the elevator, suggest a small group of students and an adult accompany her, so she does not feel alone or singled out.
  • Ask the guest if he would like to sit or hold onto in a chair inside the ride.

Employees with Disabilities: What is Reasonable Accommodation?

A reasonable accommodation is assistance or changes to a position or workplace that will enable an employee to do his or her job despite having a disability.

Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, employers are required to provide reasonable accommodations to qualified employees with disabilities, unless doing so would pose an undue hardship

Examples of Reasonable Accommodations

  1. Providing a chair for a cashier who uses crutches so he or she can sit when not assisting customers.
  2. Reserving a parking space close to the entrance for an employee who has difficulty walking because of loss of a limb.
  3. Providing instructions and information in writing for an employee with hearing loss.
  4. Permitting a staff member to bring a service animal to work.
  5. Allowing an employee with tinnitus to play background music to help block out the ringing in his ears.
  6. Allowing more frequent work breaks or providing back-up coverage when an employee with a disability needs to take a break.
  1. Providing specialized equipment for an employee who has lost a hand or finger, such as a large-key keyboard, a one-handed keyboard, a trackball, a touchpad, or speech recognition software.

  2. Flexibility in scheduling to allow an employee with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder to attend counseling sessions or offering a later start time to a staff member with a spinal cord injury who has a lengthy personal care routine.
  3. Decreasing distractions, providing information in writing, breaking down complex assignments into small steps for a person with a traumatic brain injury.
  4. Making sure equipment is within reach for an employee who uses a wheelchair.
  5. Adjusting the height of an office desk for a staff member who uses a wheelchair, and ensuring the space is not obstructed by wastebaskets or other items.

Unacceptable Practices

Examples of A Record or History of Disability

Examples:

  • An employer refuses to hire a qualified candidate due to a history of mental illness, even though the person has recovered sufficiently to perform all essential functions of the job.
  • A dentist refuses to treat a patient because he was diagnosed as having HIV, even though the diagnosis was proven to be incorrect.
  • A retail outlet fires a woman who is pregnant, because they assume she will not be able to work during the busy holiday season.

Unacceptable Practices

Regarded as Having an Impairment

Examples:

  • An employee has controlled high blood pressure, which is not substantially limiting. However, his employer fears that the employee will suffer a heart attack and reassigns the employee to a less strenuous job.
  • A person with a severe burn or scar does not actually have a disability. He may be regarded as having a disability when he faces discrimination based on people’s attitudes toward him.
  • An overweight candidate for a bus driver position is not hired because the employer assumes (without conducting tests) that she will not be able to move fast enough in case of an emergency.

Courtesy

Gum chewing – Do not chew gum when speaking to people with hearing loss. It makes you more difficult to understand

Stand in front – When speaking to people with hearing loss, stand directly in front, so they can see your lips

Paper and pencil – Have a paper and pencil ready, in case communicating through written word may be more effective than spoken word

Sit down – when speaking to a person in a wheelchair, take a seat! Looking upward may hurt their neck, and it is common courtesy to be at eye level.

Ask if the person wants help before acting – Do not assume that someone needs help. Have the respect and courtesy to ask how you may help, and then follow directions

Be patient – Do not roll your eyes, cross your arms, or rush a person who needs extra time.

Use people-first language – always refer to the person first and do not use their situation as a descriptor.

End of Session Quiz

You are at the Information Desk and a guest in a wheelchair has a question. What is the most courteous way to approach the interaction?

An employee you are managing has been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. She begins to walk with a cane, and is able to perform her job functions as school group facilitator in the laboratory. Discuss what types of accommodations can be made for her.

A child who uses crutches wants to watch the Dive Show at the Kelp Tank. All the seats are filled and many patrons have filled the open viewing area. How do you accommodate the child, so he can see the show?

List 3 new pieces of information that you learned, which you can use on the job.

1- Information Desk

Invite the guest to the side of the counter that is wheelchair accessible.

Sit at the chair, so you are eye-level.

Answer his questions respectfully.

Ask if the guest needs any assistance.

Ask if he is familiar with the location of the elevator.

2- Employee Accommodations

Review the employee’s job duties and discuss if any accommodations need to be made at this time, such as reassignment, additional time for tasks, use of a chair while working.

Make a plan to review her situation as needed, to see if any accommodations or a reassignment needs to be made.

For example, an employee who lead the student experiments in the laboratory could be reassigned to the Information Desk to answer the telephone with a headset.

3- Viewing the Show

  • Given that the situation involves a child, consult with the student’s parents or chaperone.
  • Ask if the child would like to sit by the tank or in the bleachers.
  • Show the family where the seating area for people with disabilities is located.
  • If someone is sitting in that area, respectfully work with the guest to find a spot for the child. Posted signs indicate that the are is reserved for people with special needs.
  • If there is no wiggle room, ask if the child would like a chair to sit, or ask a guest if they would mind moving over to accommodate the child.
  • Remember that you are responsible for the guests during the dive show. Feel empowered to make the situation pleasant for the guests, in a courteous manner. Call your supervisor if you need additional assistance.

WoW Hunter Professions – What’s the Best Profession For a Hunter to Take in Wotlk?

Usually Hunters in World of Warcraft have to make a decision between increasing their rank in their chosen professions and buying food for their pet. One way of avoiding this particular problem is to take two gathering professions. By doing this, everything you gather you sell and you won’t be worried about using up any of it because you won’t be able to, instead you can use the money to buy those items or consumables.

Taking two gathering wow hunter professions will allow you to simply gather up what you find along the way during your adventures and then selling them at the AH once you have a full stack of them. A lot of professionals who change professions at either 70 not so long ago, and from now on at 80 will prefer to farm the AH for cheap material rather than actually doing the gathering on their own.

Skinning is a great profession to take, because you’ll be killing a lot of creatures and the leather that you get from their hides will prove to be rather valuable in the long run. Sure at first it won’t fetch you incredible prices but as you level up and your prey levels up as well, you’ll see the amount of gold that you can charge for stacks of leather increase.

In the same vein Mining is a great gathering profession choice and one of my favorite because there is a need for ore and or bars at any given time in the game because there are three main professions that need metal: Blacksmithing, Engineering and Jewelcrafting.

World of Warcraft – Make Money With the Darkmoon Faire

World of Warcraft is an endless pool of riches that players explore in various ways. Most of them are out in the open for every WoW player and they use them to their liking, based on their play style, time availability or preference. One of the less obvious gold-making strategies in World of Warcraft is the Darkmoon Faire, a monthly event that lasts for a week and visits one out of three locations consecutively. The three Darkmoon Faire locations are: Mulgore, Elwynn Forest and Terokkar Forest.

The Darkmoon Faire has two NPCs, Lhara and Professor Thaddeus, who sell exotic goods. These items (which include rare Gems, high-level Herbs, Scrolls, Motes and Leather) spawn randomly every few minutes and can be purchased for ridiculously low prices and then sold in the Auction House for a nice profit.

The most efficient way to make gold when the Darkmoon Faire is visiting is by having two accounts: a Horde character for Mulgore, and an Alliance character for Elwynn Forest. This way, you can ensure that you will always be able to purchase Darkmoon Faire rares without worrying about unpleasant surprises from an enemy player.

Lhara mainly sells Herbs. You will generally be able to purchase 5-20 items from her in one go, provided that there is no other player camping this NPC at the same time. We recommend purchasing all the high-level herbs as well as Black Lotus or Ghost Mushrooms. We don’t recommend purchasing Mana Thistle as it is usually more expensive than your AH prices. You will also be able to buy various Leathers, but in general only the level 60+ ones are sure to yield you a good profit.

Professor Thaddeus sells rare quality Gems, Motes and Scrolls. In general, it’s recommended that you purchase all Gems except Talasite, and all Motes. Scrolls can make you some profit, but the best-sellers are Scroll of Protection V, Scroll of Agility V, Scroll of Strength V as they are on high demand from high-level raiding players.

On servers with massive population, it’s likely that you will have competition. This not only affects how many items you can purchase, but also the price variations in the Auction House for the duration of the Faire, as most players who use this strategy will attempt to sell the items as fast — and as cheap — as possible. As such, it is advisable to hold onto your purchases for a while, until their prices are back to normal.

The way you sell your items in general, and the Darkmoon Faire items in particular, affect how much money you will earn by selling them. Besides using the add-on called Auctioneer (which helps you better manage and post your items, but also offers a median price for all items), we recommend posting your auctions one by one, rather than in stacks. This way you will be able to add a few silver to the price of each item and gain 25 gold for a stack that you sold in single items, instead of 20 that you would’ve made by selling them in bulk.

When the Faire is up in Terokkar Forest, you should bring your highest level character (preferably with a flying mount and some Resilience gear) since this spot is more popular than Mulgore and Elwynn Forest. Another tip is to bring two characters – a Horde and an Alliance – and if there is another player camping the NPCs, you can always log the character on the same side in order to avoid fighting or ganking. For example, if there is a Horde character buying items from Lhara and Thaddeus, you will log your Horde character and the other player won’t be able to attack you. Since this can also work the other way around, you can log your opposing faction character to kill that player and keep loot all to yourself – but be careful not to become the gankee.

All in all, a good Darkmoon Faire crop should bring you as much as 2-3000 gold within a week with little effort (you can tab out of the game and only check the NPCs every few minutes). With any luck, that shiny epic flying mount will be yours in no time or, if you already have it, Wrath of the Lich King is just around the corner and predictions say that you’ll need a good money reserve to buy the items you need in the expansion.

WoW 19 Warlock Twink – WoW Wrath of the Lich King Level 19 Warlock Twink Guide

If want to play as a warlock and level him quickly so you can twink him at the special threshold levels you should start with an undead warlock. Will of the Forsaken is invaluable for a lock because it provides immunity to Charm, Fear and Sleep effects and it may also be used while already afflicted by Fear or Sleep effects. Also undead Warlocks will get more Intellect than orc warlocks.

If you want to play for the Alliance you can have either a Human or a Gnome Warlock and it could be a tough choice because Humans have Perception which is probably the only stealth detection ability at level nineteen and Gnomes have Engineering Racial and Expansive Mind so they get a little more Intellect. Although you don’t have to go with what I say because I know every player has their own way and preferences.

Level 19 Warlock Twink Gear:

o Head – You’ll want Green Tinted Goggles with the 8 Stamina enchant on them

o Neck – Thick Bronze Necklace

o Shoulders – Talbar Mantle which is a quest item from Wailing Caverns

o Back – Sentry Cloack with the +70 Defense Enchant

o Chest – Tree Bark Jacket with the +100 Health Enchant

o Bracers – Mindthrust Bracers with the +9 Stamina Enchant

o Hands – Magefist Gloves with the Spellpower Enchant on them

o Belt – Keller’s Girdle

o Pants- Darkweave Breeches with Mystic Spellthread on them

o Feet – Sanguine Sandals with the Minor Speed Enchant or + Stamina enchant although most prefer the speed enchant

o Ring1 – Seal of Sylvanas Ring2- Lavishly Jeweled Ring

o Weapon – Witching Stave with the +22 Intellect Enchant

o Wand – Skycaller

WoW Twink Guide – Level 19 Hunter Twink Gear (The Best Gears For Hunters)

In a nutshell a twink is a character that is a whole lot more powerful than he should be for his or her level. This is done with the help of very powerful items or high end enchants that can only be supplied from higher level players in the game. These are the main items you need for Level 19 twink hunter.

o Headgear

Usually twink hunters will have max their engineering skill up till 150 so that they can make themselves Green Tinted Goggles. This happens because you don’t usually find stat headgear until sometime later in your 20’s.

o Shoulders

The Serpent’s Shoulders which require level 18 are a great BoP drop from Lady Anacondra in the Wailing Caverns. That is an instance with tons of items, but if you want to get them all you’ll need to run it with a considerably higher level companion. You could also go to Shadowfang Keep with a high level companion and kill Rethilgore for his Rugged Spaulders which require level 15.

o Wrists

The best available item would be Forest Leather Bracers which are BoE, and they are a random drop from a variety of mobs and zones. You either get extremely lucky while grinding or you keep an eye out on the AH for this one.

o Hands

Gloves of the Fang a level 14 BoE drop from the druids of the fang in the Wailing Caverns instance, if they don’t drop you can always check the AH.

o Chest

The best chest item you can get is the level 19 Blackened Defias Armor, which is dropped by Edwin VanCleef the final boss from the Deadmines of Westfall.

This is all you need if you want to get the best Wow 19 twink hunter gear.